Posts for: July, 2013

By Sarah J. Morris, DDS, PLLC
July 29, 2013
Category: Oral Health
HowtoHelpYourselfAvoidStainedTeeth

There are many ways to brighten and whiten teeth if they become dull and stained; but if you know the causes of staining on teeth, you may be able to avoid it in the first place. Here are some of the main causes of stained teeth. We hope this will help keep your smile stain-free.

Extrinsic Staining

  1. What we call extrinsic staining occurs when stain-producing substances collect on the enamel surface of your teeth. To stop or slow this process, cut down on consumption of coffee, red wine, and tea, which contains high tannin contents.
  2. Cut down on smoking. Tobacco can stain teeth, so it's best to stop the use of tobacco in any form.
  3. Some mouthwashes and toothpastes contain substances that can cause tooth staining. Mouthwashes containing chlorhexidine, a prescription antibacterial mouthrinse, or those containing cetylpyridium chloride, can cause dental staining after long-term use. Some toothpastes contain stannous fluoride, which can also induce brown discoloration.
  4. Dry mouth, a common problem, may contribute to extrinsic discoloration. This problem is sometimes a side effect of medications you are taking and drinking more water can often alleviate it. If drugs are the cause of mouth dryness, a consultation with your physician should be considered.
  5. Bacterial buildup by chromogenic (color or stain producing) bacteria in your mouth can cause staining. Hundreds of bacteria normally live in your mouth, and it is important to keep good regular dental hygiene habits to prevent bacteria from accumulating on your teeth and gums.

Intrinsic Staining

  1. Stains that are caused by various organic compounds that build up within the mineral matrix of your tooth's enamel are called intrinsic stains. They may be caused by tooth decay within the tooth or between the tooth and dental filling materials. Tooth decay is brown, it not only discolors teeth, but it also destroys tooth structure.
  2. Use of some medications, such as tetracycline antibiotics, can cause intrinsic staining.

Make an appointment for an examination and assessment of your teeth, so that we can determine why they are developing stains. Once we know the cause, we can draw up a plan for whitening and brightening your teeth.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions about tooth staining and its treatments. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tooth Staining.”


By Sarah J. Morris, DDS, PLLC
July 19, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
HowDoWeMakeYourDentalImplantsLookSoGood

A dental implant as a permanent replacement for a missing tooth can match or even look better than your original tooth. How this happens takes knowledge, skill, experience, and even some art.

Here are some of the factors involved:

  1. Bone quantity and quality: To look and function like an original tooth, an implant must be supported by an adequate base of (jaw) bone and gum tissue. Bone has a tendency to melt away or resorb after a tooth is lost. Using new bone grafting techniques can help minimize the bone loss that occurs during healing at the extraction site. Bone grafting can also be used to rebuild lost bone at the implant site.
  2. Adequate bone supporting neighboring teeth: If you lose bone that supports teeth on either side of an implant, the papillae (the little pink triangles of gum tissue between the teeth) may not regenerate after the implant is placed.
  3. Your inborn tissue type: If your gum tissues are thin and delicate rather than thick and robust, they will be more difficult to work with. To ensure that there is sufficient gum tissue support, (gum) grafting may be necessary.
  4. Using the temporary crown as a template: A dental implant actually replaces a tooth root. Most dental implants are made of commercially pure titanium, which fuses with the bone in your jaw, making it very stable. The crown, the part of the tooth that is visible above the gum line, is attached to the implant; a customized temporary crown can be fitted to the implant. The temporary crown is a trial for the final crown. It can be used to assess color, shape, the appearance of your smile, and the implantâ??s function in your bite and speech. It gives you the opportunity to decide about design adjustments before the final, permanent crown is placed.
  5. The skill, experience, and collaboration of your dental team: Each situation is different. The final success of your implant depends on your pre-surgical assessment and diagnosis, as well as how the surgical and restorative phases of treatment are performed. The use of an outstanding dental laboratory is vital to a successful result.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment for an assessment or to discuss your questions about dental implants. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Matching Teeth & Implants.”


By Sarah J. Morris, DDS, PLLC
July 08, 2013
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: cosmetic dentistry  
YouCanPutOnaGreatFacewithVeneersandCrowns

Smiling feels great and makes others feel good as well. But if you are self-conscious about exposing teeth that are showing imperfections or excessive wear, you may not be smiling as broadly as you should be. Fortunately, there are ways to correct the esthetic issues that might be holding you back. One involves covering the natural tooth partly or completely with a natural-looking but flawless “facade.”

Perhaps you've heard about dental veneers and crowns? Both can achieve similar, eye-pleasing results by changing the shape and color of your teeth and even helping to compensate for uneven spacing or alignment. And both are custom-designed for your teeth. So what's the difference and which is right for you?

One distinguishing feature is the amount of tooth each covers. A veneer is a wafer-thin layer of dental porcelain that bonds to the front of your tooth. A crown, also fashioned from dental porcelain, fits over and covers the entire existing tooth, like a hood, right down to the gum. With either approach, to ensure the best, most natural fit, some of the natural tooth structure must be reduced by a minimal amount. In the case of veneers, up to 1 mm of tooth enamel — about the thinness of a fingernail — is removed. Crowns are generally thicker than veneers, so in their case the removal of at least 2 mm of tooth is needed.

Another difference between veneers and crowns is the situations in which one might be more suitable than the other to achieve the desired results. For example, a crown may be necessary when too much tooth structure has been lost to decay or other problems, or for use on back teeth that have to withstand greater impact from biting and chewing. A dental professional can make a recommendation based on your goals, the condition of the tooth or teeth in question, and other factors.

Either way, both veneers and crowns are an excellent solution for a range of esthetic concerns — from poor tooth color/staining, chips and cracks, and excessive wear at the bottom of teeth (from bruxism, a term for teeth grinding) to making small teeth look larger, closing minor gaps between teeth, and making slight corrections in alignment.

If you would like more information about veneers and crowns, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Porcelain Crowns & Veneers” and “Porcelain Veneers: Strength & Beauty As Never Before.”




Dentist - Fort Worth
2551 River Park Plaza
Fort Worth, TX 76116
817-732-4419

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