Posts for: February, 2014

By Sarah J. Morris, DDS, PLLC
February 24, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health  
Tooth-HarmingHabitstoAvoid

Did you know that you probably do at least one thing during the course of an average day that puts your healthy smile at risk? These are some of the more common offenders:

Coffee, Soda, and Sports Drink Consumption
If you really can’t give them up, try to consume these beverages with restraint. Their high acidity and/or sugar content can erode protective tooth enamel, making your pearly whites more prone to staining and decay. Even natural fruit juices should be consumed in moderation as they tend to be high in sugar and sometimes acidity (e.g. orange juice). Your best bet? Water, of course. It won’t damage your teeth and thanks to fluoridation may even help remineralize and fortify your enamel.

Brushing Immediately After Eating
If you were told to brush after every meal, forget it. Acids in foods and beverages can soften your enamel, and brushing may actually accelerate erosion. Wait at least an hour to brush, which is the time it generally takes for your oral pH to normalize and your tooth enamel to reharden. However, it is advisable after eating to floss and rinse out your mouth with plain water or a mineralized dental wash to help wash away food particles.

Jaw Clenching, Tooth Grinding, Pencil Chewing
These and similar “parafunctional” behaviors — outside the uses for which teeth are designed — can cause undue tooth wear and exert stresses that can cause chips and fractures. They can affect other parts of the oral system, too, potentially resulting in jaw joint pain and muscle spasms, headaches and other head and neck ailments.

It’s hard to cut out all high-sugar/high-acid foods and beverages, so where complete elimination isn’t possible, focus on moderation and try to consume them only during mealtime. Jaw clenching and other parafunctional behaviors are often subconscious and may be harder to control; in such cases an unobtrusive device like a clear occlusal (bite) guard can alleviate the problem.

If you would like more information about tooth damage and prevention please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Tooth Decay” and “Stress & Tooth Habits.”


By Sarah J. Morris, DDS, PLLC
February 21, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
LeaveEnoughTimeforYourWedding-DaySmileMakeover

Some people are planners, and others just go with the flow. Some spend all winter in the gym, and others try and lose ten pounds right before beach season. Some have every detail of their wedding day planned out months in advance, and others... don't.

No matter which kind of person you are, you'll want to look your best for your wedding day. And that includes sporting a bright, healthy-looking smile. Depending how much time you have beforehand, there's a range of dental treatments that can help you look and feel great — not just that day, but every day. Here's a rundown of what you can do in the time remaining before your big day.

Time Left: Up to two years. If you've planned this far in advance, congratulations! You probably have time for almost any needed dental treatment — including orthodontics, which can straighten misaligned teeth and correct a bad bite. But even if you don't have quite so much time, don't despair: Clear aligners and tooth-colored or tongue-side braces, if recommended, can make orthodontic appliances nearly invisible.

Time Left: Six months to one year. Many dental treatments, like periodontal plastic surgery or tooth implants, can achieve remarkable results in this time. Periodontal surgery can give you a less “gummy” smile and greatly improve the aesthetics of your teeth. Tooth implants are modern dentistry's best option for replacing missing teeth. Natural-looking implants have a success rate of 95%, and can last a lifetime.

Time left: Three or four months. There's plenty you can do! If the roots are intact, a crown can be placed on a damaged tooth to restore its appearance and function. Or, missing teeth can be replaced via bridgework, which supports a false tooth from abutments on either side. Stained or discolored teeth can also be dramatically lightened with veneers, where a porcelain shell replaces the tooth's outermost layer of enamel. Tooth implants are still a possibility, under the right circumstances. We can evaluate your individual situation and come up with the best option to replace missing teeth.

Time left: Six weeks or so. You still have time for some basic, yet effective, treatments. Small chips or discolored fillings can be restored with tooth-colored materials that securely bond to the teeth themselves. You can also brighten your teeth by several shades using the techniques of bleaching. In-office whitening treatments are the fastest, but take-home kits, used under our supervision, offer similar results in a longer time.

Have even less time? At the very least, come in for a thorough cleaning right before the date! This will help remove many surface stains and freshen up your smile. Be sure to call in advance so that you're able to get an appointment. Then, smile for the camera!

If you would like more information about a wedding-day smile makeover, please contact us or schedule an appointment to discuss your treatment options. You can learn more in the Dear Doctor magazine article “Wedding Day Smiles.”


By Sarah J. Morris, DDS, PLLC
February 13, 2014
Category: Oral Health
Tags: teething  
HelpingYourBabyCopeWiththeDiscomfortofTeething

When your baby’s first teeth erupt in the mouth, it’s a big step in their development. Unfortunately, you may not have much opportunity to celebrate — you’re too busy tending to your infant whose experience is anything but pleasant.

Commonly known as teething, the eruption process usually begins between six and nine months of age, although some children may begin as early as three months or as late as twelve. Not all teeth come in at the same time: it usually begins with the two lower front teeth, then the two upper front teeth, followed by the molars and then the canines (eye teeth). By age three, most children have all twenty of their primary teeth.

Each child’s teething experience is different and may vary in length of time and intensity. The usual signs are heightened irritability, biting and gnawing accompanied by gum swelling, ear rubbing, drooling and sometimes facial rashes. Babies also may have disturbed sleeping patterns and a decreased appetite. Occasionally, this discomfort can be intense.

There are some things you can do to ease this discomfort. Provide your baby a clean, chilled (not frozen) rubber teething ring, chilled pacifier or wet washcloth to gnaw on. Cold foods, like popsicles for older children can also be soothing, though you should limit sugary foods to lower the risk of tooth decay. You can also finger massage swollen gums to counteract the pressure coming from the erupting tooth, or administer pain relievers like baby acetaminophen or ibuprofen. You can use products with Benzocaine®, a numbing agent, for children two years or older — but you should never use alcohol for children of any age for inflamed gums.

Be sure to also set up a Year One dental examination around their first birthday. This is an important first step in your child’s long-term dental care, and a good opportunity to check their teething progress. And, by all means, if you have concerns about your child’s experience with teething, don’t hesitate to call our office.

Teething is a normal part of your child’s development. There’s much you can do to help make it as comfortable and pain-free as possible.

If you would like more information on teething, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Teething Troubles.”


By Sarah J. Morris, DDS, PLLC
February 05, 2014
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  
ItCanPaytoSpendonDentalImplants

If you’re missing a tooth, you’re not alone; in fact 35 million Americans are missing all of their teeth in at least one jaw! Whether it’s one tooth or many, it’s important to replace what’s missing. Depending on the number of teeth lost, the potential drawbacks to doing nothing may become hard to ignore: impediments to eating, interference with speech, and unaesthetic appearance, for example.

Traditional bridges and dentures are the most affordable options for replacing teeth. Tooth implants — tiny titanium, screw-like substitutes for a tooth’s natural root to which natural-looking dental crowns are attached — are pricier but offer an important extra benefit. In addition to addressing the common problems previously mentioned, by acting like the original tooth root, an implant can maintain or stimulate “remodeling,” of the jawbone below. Without a tooth root to provide stimulation, mature bone cells will continue to be removed, or resorbed, but no new bone cells will regenerate to replace them, leading to a progressive loss of bone width, height and density. The more teeth are lost, and with less bone structure to support it, the whole shape of the face can change.

Unfortunately, when greater numbers of teeth must be replaced, implants can become financially unrealistic for some people. But in appropriate cases there is a third option: a bridge or denture/implant hybrid. In the case of a bridge intended to fill a gap when multiple teeth are missing, an implant can be used on either side of the gap to support the bridge, leaving the natural teeth undisturbed. Strategically placed implants can be used to support a removable denture, too.

If you would like more information about dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implants: Your Best Option For Replacing Teeth.”




Dentist - Fort Worth
2551 River Park Plaza
Fort Worth, TX 76116
817-732-4419

Archive:

Tags